How Cloud Computing Works

How Cloud Computing Works
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How Cloud Computing Works

As defined by IBM, Cloud computing is the provision of computing resources to the user, depending on the purpose of use over an Internet connection. That resource can be anything related to computation and a computer, such as software, hardware, server networking infrastructure, and large network servers.

Before the cloud era, if you wanted to do something, you had to do it yourself and invest yourself from start to finish. If you want to save data, you need to buy a hard drive as an individual user. If you want to manage the sales of a family store, you need to buy accounting or sales software and install it on your computer.

Costs Before the Cloud Era

And all the costs do not end there. The amount you have allocated will follow you after that, the so-called “maintenance” or “maintenance” costs. For example, if you have one computer, you need to replace or fix it if the hard drive breaks down. In addition, to avoid the risk of data loss, you need to back up your Data constantly; usually, essential data must be periodically backed up to a backup disk, which will increase your costs.

These problems look pretty straightforward, but they require a lot of work and money from you. For enterprises, the costs of “maintaining” are very high, since they use not only small software such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint but also other large and complex control systems, with constantly incoming and outgoing data, so only minor malfunctions can lead to lose USD million in revenue or slow down production. They have to pay to support a team of personnel to install, configure, test, run, ensure security and upgrade their system. If you take this amount and multiply it by the hundreds of applications that the enterprise uses, this amount is not small.

Scaling in Cloud Computing

Scaling In Cloud Computing

Then cloud computing came along with scaling in cloud computing; it helps to some extent your management of software and hardware. Are you looking for data? There is OneDrive, Dropbox or Google Drive to help you. You do not need to worry about which hard drive you store your files; whether it is damaged or not, you need to copy it or not. Cloud service providers have taken care of everything, and in this case, it’s Dropbox, Microsoft, Google. If the hard drive is damaged, they will replace it themselves; they will periodically make a backup copy of the data themselves; you do not need to worry about anything.

Another example: Contact list on the phone. Previously, you had to periodically save your contact list to your computer and keep these contact files; then, if you change your phone, you need to spend time reinstalling contacts. Now there is Google, Apple, Microsoft, or BlackBerry to take care of your contact list. Every time you add a new number, contacts will be synchronized on the “clouds” and kept there. In the case when you change the phone, the contacts will be quickly downloaded. There is no need to constantly save or copy your files, which can be pretty time-consuming, especially if you have a lot of documents.

For enterprises, they are starting to move their applications or software to the cloud. Need accounting software? You need to enter the browser, click a couple of times, and enter the application. You don’t need to think about installing this software; the provider has already updated it when an update appears. Furthermore, you just have to open it and use it. In this case, the enterprise does not need to have a team of personnel to maintain the software.

FAQ’s

How Does Cloud Storage work?

Cloud storage is accessible via a network connection and can be accessed and downloaded on any laptop, tablet, or smartphone. The cloud storage system allows users to edit documents simultaneously with others, making it easier to work from afar.

What is Cloud Technology?

Data centers are the heart of cloud computing. You store it in virtual servers rather than storing your information on your phone, computer, or tablet. They are connected to large data centers with the infrastructure for storing and protecting your data.

What is a Cloud Computing network?

The use of cloud computing is an IT infrastructure in which a company’s network and computing resources are contained in a public or private cloud platform, hosted in-house or by an outside service provider, and available on demand.

Cloud Computing: who controls it?

Cloud service providers control the data that you create, but you own the Data you create. The terms of service of many providers state that they can retain data to comply with legal requirements

Who invented Cloud Computing?

Joseph Licklider is credited with inventing cloud computing in the 1960s with his work on ARPANET, which connected data and people from anywhere, anytime. CompuServe provided its subscribers with a small amount of disk space in the early 1980s, which allowed them to upload any file they wanted.

How Does it get its name?

As the name suggests, cloud computing refers to accessing information remotely in a virtual space or cloud. A cloud service provider lets users store files and applications on remote servers and then access them online. Public and private clouds are available.

Google Drive: Is it a Cloud?

You can store files online in Google Drive and access them from any smartphone, tablet, or computer with access to the internet. With Google Drive, you can securely upload files and edit them online from any computer or mobile device. You can even collaborate with others on the same files using Google Drive.

Could Dropbox be considered a cloud?

Yes, Dropbox is considered to be a cloud. With Dropbox, you can save files online and sync them across multiple devices.

How is Data stored in the cloud?

Cloud-based Data is not stored on your device (for example, your laptop or phone hard drive) but rather elsewhere – on servers owned by big companies – and is accessed by you over the internet.

Thank you for reading!

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